Probate Attorney Orange County Florida

Orlando Probate, Estate Planning, & Guardianship Lawyers

Veteran Owned and Run

​Orlando Office: 33 E. Robinson St., Suite 111, Orlando, FL 32801

Clearwater Office: 235 N. Garden Ave., Clearwater, FL 33755

Orlando Criminal Defense, Civil Litigation, Estate Planning and Probate Lawyers. Handling cases in Orange County and surrounding areas

Call now for a Free Consultation:

(321) 314-2828

Or just give us your email and we'll contact you!​

Client Review

"Josh did such an amazing job!I was always up too date on all proceedings. He represented me with multiple cases and all the results were phenomenal! Would recommend him to anyone!"

Rating: 5/5 Stars
Written by: Jason S. See More Reviews From Thumbtack

Attorney Advertising. The material and information contained on these pages and on any pages linked from these pages is intended to provide general information only and not legal advice. You should consult with an attorney licensed to practice in your jurisdiction before relying upon any of the information presented here. You are advised that the acts of sending email to or viewing information from this website does not create an attorney-client relationship.

A Statewide Estate Planning & Probate practice

The Adams Law Firm is now handling probate case throughout all of Florida.

Our main office is in downtown Orlando, but, we have a satellite office in Clearwater Beach and plans to open a satellite office in West Palm Beach.

You can be confident that we can handle your probate matter regardless of which Florida county your loved one lived, including:

Alachua, Baker, Bay, Bradford, Brevard, Broward, Calhoun, Charlotte, Citrus, Clay, Collier, Columbia, DeSoto, Dixie, Duval, Escambia, Flagler, Franklin, Gadsden, Gilchrist, Glades, Gulf, Hamilton, Hardee, Hendry, Hernando, Highlands, Hillsborough, Holmes, Indian, River, Jackson, Jefferson, Lafayette, Lake, Lee, Leon, Levy, Liberty, Madison, Manatee, Marion, Martin, Miami-Dade, Monroe, Nassau, Okaloosa, Okeechobee, Orange, Osceola, Palm Beach, Pasco, Pinellas, Polk, Putnam, Santa Rosa, Sarasota, Seminole, St. Johns, St. Lucie, Sumter, Suwannee, Taylor, Union, Volusia, Wakulla, Walton & Washington Counties

"Let Our Family Help Yours"

For More Information, visit

Experienced Orlando Probate, Estate

Planning, Will & Trusts and Guardianship

Lawyers; ​Call Now for a Free Consultation

(321) 314-2828

​If property must be transferred as a result of a death, you must use an attorney. A probate case should be filed in the country where the decedent lived at the time of their death. We offer free consultations and our fees are often paid through the estate. We handle cases throughout all Florida. If you believe you are a beneficiary of the estate of a recent decedent who lived in Florida, you should speak to a Florida Probate Lawyer. In Florida, there are three ways to settle an estate. Here’s an overview of each one, from the simplest and least expensive to the most complicated and costly. Florida law requires that anyone who has possession of a will must file it with the local circuit court within 10 days of learning of the death. If a probate court proceeding is necessary, the court will determine whether or not the will is valid.

Assets That Don’t Go Through Probate

Many assets of the deceased person may be able to go to their new owner without probate court approval. The most common kinds of non-probate property are:

  • Property held in joint tenancy by more than one person—for example, a house owned by a couple, or a bank account shared by more than one person
  • Assets for which the person designated a beneficiary—for example, a POD bank account, a retirement account, or life insurance proceeds
  • Assets held in a living trust

No Probate (Disposition Without Administration)

When the deceased person leaves very little behind, this process lets someone who paid for the person’s final expenses—the funeral and expenses of the last illness—be reimbursed from the assets of the estate. (Fla. Stat. 735.301.)

It can be used only when:

  • the deceased person did not leave any real estate, and
  • the only assets are either exempt from creditors’ claims or don’t exceed the amount of final expenses.

To request reimbursement, you file a form called “Disposition of Personal Property Without Administration, ” which is available from the clerk of the court and on many Florida circuit courts’ websites. There’s a small filing fee; call ahead or check the court’s website to find out the exact cost.

The document must state how much you’ve spent, and you must document those expenses by submitting itemized bills and receipts for funeral bills and for medical expenses that were incurred during the last 60 days of the deceased person’s life. You must also state exactly which assets (a bank account, for example) you are requesting payment from. A certified copy of the death certificate must accompany the request. If there’s a will, it must also be filed with the local circuit court.

This probate shortcut can be used by many Florida estates. It’s an option if either:

  • the death occurred more than two years ago, OR
  • the value of the probate estate—that’s all the property that would have to go through probate, so it excludes the nonprobate assets described above—is not more than $75, 000.

To start this process, the person who was nominated in the will to be executor, or anyone who inherits property, files a document called a Petition for Summary Administration. The surviving spouse, if any, must sign and verify the petition. If any beneficiary doesn’t sign the petition, you must formally deliver (serve) that person with notice that you have filed the petition. (Fla. Stat. 735.201.)

Resources
  • que día es hoy
Related Posts